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Lamorna

Hengan p16


Soa now I’ll sing to ee,
Tes abowt a maiden fair
I met tha oather aevenen
en tha corner of tha square.
She ad a dark an roven eye,
she waz a charmen roaver,
An we road oll night
En tha pale moonlight
Awae down t’ Lamorna.

Twas down en Albert Square
I neer er shall forgit,
er eyes they shoan like dymons
an tha eavenen et was wit, wit, wit.
Er air ung down en curls,
she was a charmen roaver,
An we road oll night
En tha pale moonlight
Awae down t’ Lamorna.

 
 Az we got en tha cab
I axed er fer er naem,
An wen she givd et me,
Well mine et woz tha saem.
Soa I lefted up er veil,
Fer er faes woz coavered oaver;
T’ my surprise
it woz me wife
I’d road down t’ Lamorna.

She said, “I knawed ee well,
I nawd ee all tha while,
I nawd you en tha dark
An I did un fer a lark,
An fer that lark you’ll pay
Fer tha roven of yer donor.
You’ll pay tha fare,
I do delare,
Awae down t’ Lamorna.

The origins of ‘Lamorna’ are not truly known, but I suspect every one in Cornwall knows it, and every version is slightly different! It sounds as if it comes from a Penzance review of Edwardian times. ‘Jorey’s Jingle’, a horse drawn vehicle, used to run from Albert Square, Penzance to Lamorna Cove three miles South West.

Again this song has become very popular throughout Cornwall especially with dialect singers. The line ‘I knawed ee well’ in the last verse shows clearly it was written in the Dialect but as with so many songs, poems and hymns Standard English tends to take over when a written version is required. 

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